Introducing Healthcare Stories

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Introducing Healthcare Stories

Healthcare is a universal right. We cannot allow the members of Congress, whom we voted into office on the express condition of protecting our rights to well-being and health, destabilize and eliminate the only policies guaranteeing us these rights. This fight belongs to American citizens who build the communities we live in.

This Healthcare Stories blog is the United Valley Interfaith Project’s collection of healthcare stories from New Hampshire and Vermont. As you read through the stories, listen: can you find yourself in the story? Everything begins with telling and listening to stories, making this a fundamental part of the fight that ropes together all members of our community, of our nation.

When it comes to healthcare, every one of us has a personal and compelling story that is a crucial part of not only our national narrative, but also of the narrative in our communities. UVIP recognizes the importance of this narrative in shaping healthcare policy, and so we have sought to create a space where individuals can share stories that inform, educate, and become evidence towards the need for available and accessible healthcare.

Functioning partially as a creative space and as an archive, this blog is a place to document and discover the healthcare issues resonating through our community today. We invite you to read through these stories personally written by residents of New Hampshire and Vermont, and to consider sharing your own story with us.

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Healthcare Stories | Alice Reed Morrison

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Healthcare Stories | Alice Reed Morrison

I have been on Disability since 2007 (age 54 to 64) because of chronic Lyme Disease and (untreated) severe sleep apnea. During this time I have had coverage through Medicare and Vermont Medicaid.

My severe sleep apnea problem is due to congenital factors: my facial bone structure, jaws, and throat passage are very small for an adult. I don't fit the profile of a sleep apnea sufferer, that of an overweight, middle-aged man. I have never smoked, am of normal weight, have done yoga for 33 years, and exercise regularly. Apparently, after menopause, one's muscle tone relaxes so the blockage of air in my throat got worse with age. Because I was unable to tolerate CPAP machine or dental apparatus, I had surgery within my mouth in 2007 to attempt to alleviate the apnea.  However, for me the operation provided no relief and I was never informed of any other possible remedies.

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